Slowing Down

I’ve been starting some of my mornings sitting in my backyard gazing off into the woods

Listening to the birds crickets and other insects are cacophony of silence nature in its splendor

The gentle breeze stirs the leaves on the tree as sunlight infuse them with such a verdant green color that has begun to shift towards amber- scarlet hues

I feel the gentle breeze on my skin; a hint of coolness, subtleties of autumn

I see delicate spiderwebs shimmer as the sun catches and reflects in each droplet of dew

I hear a hawk, more near now searching for prey in the morning sunlight

There is so much promise in the morning light

Free

I am most content in Nature, be it mountains or fields, in these places I have a sense of connection, of suchness that eludes me in trappings of concrete and steel. When I am able to spend even brief moments in the bounty of the earth, I am reborn, refreshed and deeply content.

I recently stumbled across the writings of Wendell Berry, a man of “suchness” and I think this quote from his essay “A Native Hill” captures the essence of the lightness and depth one feel’s amidst Nature’s verdant realms.

“And so I go to the woods. As I go in under the trees, dependably, almost at once, and by nothing I do, things fall into place. I enter an order that does not exist outside, in the human spaces. I feel my life take its place among the lives-the trees, the annual plants, the animals and birds, the living of all these and the dead-that go and have gone to make the life of the earth.
“I am less important than I thought, the human race is less important than I thought. I rejoice in that. My mind loses its urgings, senses its nature and is free.”
~Wendell Berry, A Native Hill

Pitchoff & Balancing Rock, Adirondacks